Your IP is: 100.26.179.251 Hits: 956,046 Take the Tour I'd like a My Client Page Make Us Your Home Page
Select Layout:
|

Tips

Would you consider supporting our page?

We accept Bitcoin, Ethereum or Dash.

Our tips address is: data-recovery.crypto

That address works for all those cryptos.

Thanks so much. The Client Page Team.

Personal

Notepad

Of the Day

Today's Quote
  • Havelock Ellis
    "All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on."
This Day in History - HISTORY
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art opens in New York City
    On April 13, 1870 the Metropolitan Museum of Art is officially incorporated in New York City. The brainchild of American expatriates in Paris and a number of wealthy New Yorkers, the Met would not put on an exhibition until 1872, but it quickly blossomed into one of the world’s premier repositories ...
Wikimedia Commons picture of the day feed
APOD
Today I Found Out
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
  • minatory

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 13, 2021 is:

    minatory • \MIN-uh-tor-ee\  • adjective

    : having a menacing quality

    Examples:

    "Then the squirrel seemed to notice Vinnie; to turn a minatory black eye toward him. The eye extended out from its head an inch or two on a little silvery stalk and tilted this way and that." — John Shirley, Crawlers, 2003

    "In 'Wonderland,' a retired ballerina named Orla Moreau (H.G. Wells-reference alert!) and her husband, a lifelong dilettante named Shaw, move their two young kids from Manhattan to the woods of upstate New York so he can pursue his new passion for painting. An isolated old house in December, some minatory trees in the yard—what could go wrong?" — Bill O'Driscoll, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 20 Aug. 2020

    Did you know?

    Knowing that minatory means "threatening," can you take a guess at a related word? If you're familiar with mythology, perhaps you guessed Minotaur, the name of the bull-headed, people-eating monster of Crete. Minotaur is a good guess, but as terrifying as the monster sounds, its name isn't related to minatory. The relative we're searching for is actually menace. Minatory and menace both come from derivatives of the Latin verb minari, which means "to threaten." Minatory was borrowed directly from Late Latin minatorius. Menace came to English via Anglo-French manace, menace, which came from Latin minac-, minax, meaning "threatening."




Audio Poem of the Day
    

World News

Technology

Entertainment