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Of the Day

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This Day in History - HISTORY
  • Marvin Gaye's hit single "What's Going On?" released
    January 20, 1971, sees the release of Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On?" In addition to being a massive hit, the song marked a turning point in Gaye's career and in the trajectory of Motown. Gaye achieved popularity in the 1960s with songs like "How Sweet it Is (To Be Loved by You)" and "I Heard It ...
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Today I Found Out
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
  • gulosity

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 20, 2021 is:

    gulosity • \goo-LAH-suh-tee\  • noun

    : excessive appetite : greediness

    Examples:

    "After a Christmas period generally spent lying down, motionless and swollen, it was time to get back to a life of squats, lunges and sub-9,000 calorie days. Before letting go of my acquired gulosity completely, I decided to indulge in one last meal of excess." — James Ashford, The Independent (UK), 11 Jan. 2013

    "By the time I was in high school, so convinced was I of the worthiness and delectations of [the English] language that I pounced upon its literature with a ravenous appetite that, at times, alarmed my father, who thought my sociability was cast into arrears owing to my bookish gulosity." — Ramnath Subramanian, The El Paso (Texas) Times, 9 Sep. 2004

    Did you know?

    Gulosity is a rare word for "gluttony" that sees only occasional use in English these days. It derives via Middle English and Anglo-French from the Latin adjective gulosus ("gluttonous") and ultimately from the noun gula ("gullet"). It was apparently a favorite word of famed 18th-century author and lexicographer Samuel Johnson, who has been falsely credited with coining gulosity, even though evidence for the word's use dates back to the 15th century. According to his biographer, James Boswell, Johnson was no light eater himself: he "indulged with such intenseness, that while in the act of eating, the veins of his forehead swelled, and generally a strong perspiration was visible."




Audio Poem of the Day
  • Do-rag

    by Phillip B. Williams


    

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