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Of the Day

Today's Quote
  • Plato
    "Man - a being in search of meaning."
This Day in History - HISTORY
  • Third Estate makes Tennis Court Oath
    In Versailles, France, the deputies of the Third Estate, which represent commoners and the lower clergy, meet on the Jeu de Paume, an indoor tennis court, in defiance of King Louis XVI’s order to disperse. In these modest surroundings, they took the historic Tennis Court Oath, with which they ...
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Today I Found Out
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
  • demeanor

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 20, 2019 is:

    demeanor • \dih-MEE-ner\  • noun

    : behavior toward others : outward manner

    Examples:

    The professor's friendly and laid-back demeanor made him a favorite among the students.

    "Detroit's well-earned place as one of America's most iconic cities is a credit to its past, present and future. It is a city that has never had it easy, but its steely demeanor has also always encased and protected a powerful heart." — Adweek.com, 14 May 2019

    Did you know?

    There's a long trail from the Latin origins of demeanor to its English incarnation. It starts with minari, "to threaten"—a word connected to the threatening cries of cattle drivers. Leaving minari, we soon encounter a close Latin relation, minare; it means "to drive," and was once used specifically of driving animals for herding. From there, the path leads us to Anglo-French, where we pass by mener ("to lead") and then demener ("to conduct"). Next comes Middle English demenen and then Modern English demean, both meaning "to conduct (oneself) in a certain manner." And, finally, we take one last step, and add the suffix -or to demean to get demeanor.




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